About your Search

20130325
20130325
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to
and everyday we know that the epidemic of violent vls knows no raise carried or religion but we also know that there are absolutely objective risk forks that we can pass on and that is the hope and action of wrap around we work to reduce those risk factors associated with violent injury and community partners and by doing so we give young people the opportunity to live if become heros and by reducing the injury resid diskism these case manager that is i have to have on stage with me because they are so much everything to me ... (applause) they work they work everyday to make my night job observe sleet and i would love to see that day. i want to first thank these case managers and haive judiciary and ruben and michael you are the heros full of home, determination and inspiration i'm so proud of what you have done and i thank you for absolutely being my brothers in this cause. i couldn't say enough (applause) . >> to our compliant rep.s our cline in the back of the room, joe drakely please stand up and let us give you a hand. thank you for trusting us in your journey to a rich life and
schools catholic, if you'll treat catholicism as the state religion of italy, then we'll set up a concordance with you, and you'll give us the status of a separate country. the van can is a separate country. it doesn't have any normal citizens, you know, no women citizens. it's got post offices and other signs of the government, but it's a fake government. it's a fantasy government. you know, it's kind of a disneyland government. [laughter] nobodiments to take -- nobody wants to take it away. my wife refused to go to the vatican after the first few times. it's got beautiful treasures in there, but it's a great fortress is great treasures inside, and everywhere, paintings of the donation of con stan tine, the mystical giving of worldly power to the pope, painting on chairs of the bishop peter, which he never was, coats of arms of all of the noble popes who took over in the renaissance, and she said, you know, what could be more against the gospel of jesus than this earthly trumpeting of power and pride? it's not going to go away, but as i say, we really should start treating it w
the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >> what i said, i think we're going to win. i don't think we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. and i don't think there is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> what is your take on that with prop 8? will it divide the court as some other issues? >> i think it will be divisive. i can't call exactly what the numbers breakdown will be but it is important to note that in the california situation, what you've got is a state that first gave rights to same sex marriage. to gays. and then yanked it away in this proposition 8. and i think that makes it a different case than whether there is a right to same sex marriage nationally and in all the states. here, it looks very much like something that was given was then taken away and maybe because they just don't like gay people. that is the argument. so in that situation, i think we have a very special case. and there is
that the world religions have a lot in common, but there is something very special about christianity and the person of christ, and that is an extremely well documented -- i became somewhat against my own best interests as a scientist a believer. >> have you ever doubted that since? >> oh, sure. every believer have to have doubts. it is an element of belief, doubt, but doubt is a good thing because it lets you know what .ou need to dig deeper into >> what impact has it had on you as a scientist in that scientific community that views outwardly acknowledge yourself -- that you outwardly acknowledge yourself to be in? >> a god to whom one may pray. that is not hypothetical. perspective.eist scientists do not talk about that. i have written a book to speak about this because of a desire to particularly help those that are wrestling with the issues to see that there are ways. a comet from that of your about the waterfall i guess is an easy one -- that comment from that viewer about the waterfall i guess is an easy one. a creator that has an intelligence and a mind -- it was a moment of ha
language, shared the same religion faith and history. at the end of the war, what could we have done to stop it? one thing is a vital free press. men and women set on telling the truth. the faults in the intelligence, the alternative paths that the leaders have failed to explore and an estimate of the horrors to come. tonight we discussed the build-up to the war and the bad decision to bury so much of it. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politicsnation" with al sharpton starts right now. >>> thanks, chris, and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, finishing the job. president obama is back on u.s. soil fresh from his well-received trip to the middle east and today he jumped right back into the fight for second-term agenda, demanding that congress take action on immigration. >> we've taken real action from congress, bipartisan groups in the house and senate, working to tackle this challenge. i applaud them for that. we are making progress but we've got to finish the job because this issue is not new. emp pretty much knows what is broken. everybody knows
of religion or faith and that causes the tradition and women to the to be limited or the girl or a child not to be sent to school and therefore we issued a strong statement of the elders about three years ago now saying that the leaders should champion the quality of girls and women that should be part of their spirituality and their faith and most of them are men. [applause] and then we said that's all very well but what are we going to do practically? and that brought us to the early child marriage issue and because marriage isn't a private thing it is sanctioned in some religious way and therefore it was a good example. i was aware of the expense of this in certain countries but by and large we underestimated and the archbishop is honest about saying that he totally underestimated the numbers that we are talking about. 10 million girls a year. that is 100 million girls in a decade or married without their consent, and very often without their knowledge on today itself way before they are ready for it physically or emotionally. we went to ethiopia where blah, -- the blah is and they we
of years of wrestling with this and beginning to recognize that the world religions have a lot in common, but there is something very special about christianity and the person of christ, and that is an extremely well documented -- i became somewhat against my own best interests as a scientist a believer. since? >> oh, sure. doubts. doubt is not the opposite of the leaf. -- of a belief. it is an element of belief, doubt, but doubt is a good thing because it lets you know what you need to dig deeper into. why is this bothering me? what have other people facing this come to understand that helps me? >> what impact has it had on you as a scientist in that scientific community that you outwardly acknowledge yourself to believe? >> i am not that different. 40% of working scientists believe in a personal god to whom you might pray. that is not hypothetical. that is a theist perspective. scientists do not talk about that. i have written a book to speak about this because of a desire to particularly help those that are wrestling with the issues to see that there are ways. that comment from that v
or break the electorate down by religion. for example, white evangelicals form a strong part of the republican party base. they are overwhelmingly opposed. but everybody else who is not a white evangelical christian by 20-plus points support freedom to marry. >> i want to go through some of these numbers that show the shift. some of them are in places we might think independents. but a lot of them are not. so, look, this is abc "washington post" polling. '04, 15% of republicans support gay marriage. now 33%, more than double, i'm not a math major but i think that's right. conservatives, 10% in '04 -- three times as much. and minorities, 28 -- this is remarkable and i think honestly, barack obama deserves a significant amount of credit for being an african-american president of the united states, supporting same-sex marriage. 28% in 2004. 61% now. alex, these changes, they're not just -- it's not democrats getting more in favor of it. here's the fundamental question. what does your party do? this is what we have been talking about. you have some people saying -- john huntsman,
republican, religion comes from church, basic moral beliefs. according in this poll, they're the same people. better than that, the business conservatives buy into the cultural issues. cultural driven people buy into the business issues. it's heterogeneous. >> it's heterogeneous internally but they turned inward. a generation ago the republican party reached outward and reached to people who had been democrats. they expanded demographically because they got a lot of catholics, got northern catholics in the party who hadn't been there before and got southerners who had been democrats and who were economically diverse. there were a lot of working class and middle class democrats who came over to the republican party. so they were expanding a generation ago by reaching out. what's happened now, because of ideology, because of the focus on ideology, these two groups look for ideological overlaps and that's all they talk about. that's all they talk about. in common areas they can agree, whether it's abortion or guns or r lower taxes. they're talking to each other, not to the whole country. >> thi
time. i'm not accusing everybody who's against gay marriage as bigotry. it's true that some religions treat that, which may or may not be bigotry. >> this case is the fact that the equal protection clause will create a new class. >> that's the state of this country, and individuals have a right to be treated the same way as everybody else. and that is at the core of this debate. >> a tricky question. but it violates the equal protection clause. you have to create a new class of people. >> do we need more individual rights, or is this a question about marriage? those are two different -- they may be related, but they're two different things. >> that's a very important question. the question before the supreme court, regardless of who's changing their mind on it or whose loved one is gay. who among us doesn't have a loved one who's gay. that's a given. the question is whether the 14th amendment clause should create a new class of people? the supreme court hasn't done that in 30 years. >> it's about whether the equal protection clause protects people who have the right to marry. >> that'
the meaning of freedom of religion and the establishment of religion. we debate the meaning of freedom of speech. we debate what equality means and how it translates to equality on issues of race, gender, and sexuality. we debate the role of different branches of government, the role of the president as the commander in chief, and as the head of the executive branch. and the roles of congress and .he roles of the courts as much as they are contentious and changing in the general rinas of american life, they must in turn be translated and interpreted and applied to our armed forces. while it is sometimes true the political decision, the social policy decision, the legal and constitutional decision that emerges in a civilian arena, is transferred in exactly the same manner to our military. there are times when it is not. there are times when the particular necessities of national security or the particular intensity of the organization and values and mission of the military require some just -- adjustment. exactlyot be adopted in the same way in the context of our military. -- deeply gra
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)